1 January 1803

The aquatint View of Pont St Michel, taken from PONT NEUF, plate four of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1866b). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Richard Bankes Harraden (1778–1862).

The aquatint View of PONT AU CHANGE, the City Theatre, Pont Neuf, Conciergerie Prison, &c, Taken from PONT NOTRE DAME, plate nine of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1876a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856).

The aquatint View of the Palace & Village of Choisi on the Banks of the SEINE, plate fourteen of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1882a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856).

The aquatint THE WATER MILL above the Bridge AT CHARENTON, plate nineteen of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1890a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856).

The aquatint On the Banks of the MARNE below the Bridge AT CHARENTON, plate twenty of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1887a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Richard Bankes Harraden (1778–1862).

1 January 1803

'Covent Garden', The Monthly Mirror, vol.15 (January 1803), p.56

The article praises Thomas Dibdin’s (1771–1841) new ‘Christmas pantomime’:

Mr. Harris has been at immense expense for scenery, which chiefly represents some of the most striking objects on the road to Paris: – the gates of Calais, Quillacque’s hotel there, the Pont au Change, Conciergerie, Pont Neuf, &c. and St. Denis’s gate at Paris. There is also a most delightful view of Rochester Bridge, with the Castle and Cathedral, by RICHARDS. Phillips has distinguished himself very much on this occasion, having painted no less than six of the scenes.

1 January 1803

‘The New Pantomime at Covent Garden’, The Sporting Magazine, vol.21 (January 1803), pp.204–5

Discussing Thomas Dibdin’s (1771–1841) new pantomime, the reviewer notes:

The second act proceeds in a tour through part of France, with a succession of escapes and adventures occurring, through a great variety of scenes, finely executed, and, which the play bills amply enumerate. … Much ingenuity is displayed throughout, and the liberality of the manager, in the scenic and decorative departments, was never more conspicuously demonstrated. The scenery is altogether of the most charming description, and does much credit to the talents of the several artists, Whitmore, Richards, Philips, Creswell, and Hollogan.

The reviewer especially praises Dartford by Moonlight, painted by Matthew John Hollagan (c.1773–1836).

9 January 1803

Bell’s Weekly Messenger, 9 January 1803, p.14; repeated with small variations in The Oracle and Daily Advertiser, 10 January 1803, p.1

Promenade-Rooms, Spring-Gardens, Jan. 6, 1803. – Mrs. GIRTIN, widow of the late Mr. THOMAS GIRTIN, respectfully informs the public, that, at the request of a number of admirers of his productions, the EIDOMETROPOLIS, or Panoramic Picture of London and Westminster, will be exhibited at the above place till the last day of July next. – Admittance one shilling. The Picture is to be disposed of, and is well worthy the attention of any Gentleman going abroad, as it was painted by the late Mr. GIRTIN for that purpose. For particulars enquire at No.11, Scott’s-place, Islington; or Mr. JOHN GIRTIN, No. 1, Newport-street, Gerard-street, Soho; where may be seen, and as above, Mr. T. GIRTIN’s views of Paris, drawn and etched by himself; they will be published early next month.

10 January 1803

The aquatint View of the Pantheon taken from the ARSENAL, plate twelve of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1879b). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856).

15 January 1803

The aquatint View of the Thuilleries & Bridge, &c., taken from PONT de la CONCORDE, plate six of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1871a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by William Pickett (1740–1812).

The aquatint View of PONT NEUF, part of the Louvre, Notre Dame, & the College of four Nations, plate seven of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1872a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856).

The aquatint The Water Works at Marli and ST. GERMAIN en LAYE seen in the distance, plate fifteen of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1883a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Richard Bankes Harraden (1778–1862).

The aquatint View of the Village of Chaillot, &c., taken from PONT de la CONCORDE, plate seventeen of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1885a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856).

16 January 1803

The Observer, 16 January 1803, p.1

NOW EXHIBITING … GRAND PANORAMA of London, Westminster, and Environs … upon the amazing extensive Scale of 1944 Square Feet, commanding the most interesting part of the Thames, with every House, Church, the Bridges, &c finely discriminated.

19 January 1803

George Capel-Coningsby, 5th Earl of Essex (1757–1839) purchases the presentation set of ‘Drawings of Paris’ from John Girtin (1773–1821) for fifty pounds (Chancery, Income and Expenses, 1804).

22 January 1803

The Morning Post, 22 January 1803, p.1

A BUST of the Late celebrated Artist Mr THOMAS GIRTIN, executed from a Cast of the Face in Plaster of Paris, immediately after his death and finished from a Portrait painted by Mr Opie. Mr. Girtin was in the bloom of youth when he died, being only twenty-eight years old; he had a countenance extremely interesting, which is restored in this work very much to the satisfaction of his relations and friends. Those who value the memory of a Man, whose work must ever remain amongst the first examples for excellence in the Art of Landscape Painting, and who may wish to have a Copy or Cast of his Bust, will be pleased to send their names to Mr. Garrard, Associate of the Royal Academy, No.28, George-street, Hanover-square.

The bust by George Garrard (1760–1826) has been lost, whilst the death mask was destroyed in the 1930s.

25 January 1803

The aquatint A View of Pont Neuf, the Mint, &c., plate eight of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1874a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Frederick Christian Lewis (1779–1856).

26 January 1803

Kenneth Garlick and others, eds., The Diary of Joseph Farington (Farington, Diary, 26 January 1803)

Reporting the opinion of James Northcote (1746–1831), Joseph Farington (1747–1821) records:

Turner has a great deal of painters feeling, but his works too much made up from pictures, not enough of original observation of nature. Thinks Girtin had more of it. – Smirke differed from him in this respect.

29 January 1803

John Girtin (1773–1821) publishes an etching by François Louis Thomas Francia (1772–1839) as a guide to the Eidometropolis (British Museum, London (1863,0110.98)). The print shows the 360-degree view as a semi-circle. Without a key, it could have performed no practical function for visitors.

February 1803

The Gentleman’s Magazine, vol.73, no.1 (February 1803), p.187 (1803 – Item 1)

The fact that this anonymous writer was so well informed on details such as the fact that the artist was working until ‘8 days’ before his death was presumably down to being briefed by John Girtin (1773–1821).

Mr GIRTIN, who died at the house of Mr. Norman, picture-frame maker, in the Strand, Nov 9 1802, was born Feb 18 1773. His complaint was an asthma, with which he had been long afflicted; but, so much was he attached to his profession, that he worked at it till within 8 days of his death. He received his first instruction from Mr. Fisher, a drawing-master in Aldersgate-Street; and was, for a short time, the pupil of Mr. Dayes. He early made Nature his model; but the first master that struck his attention forcibly was Canaletti. Sir Joshua Reynolds was accustomed to say, that the colouring of Rubens was sunshine; and this Girtin seems to have felt, for, in the latter part of his life, he sedulously studied the colouring of that great master. He was the first who introduced the custom of drawing upon cartridge-paper; by which means he avoided the spotty, glittering glare so common in drawings made on white paper; and some of his later productions have as forcible and spirited an effect as an oil-picture, and are more clear. In his first manner he made the outline with a pen, but lately did away that hard outline, which gives so edgy an effect to drawings that are not, in other respects, destitute of merit; and, having first given his general forms with Indian ink, finished his work by putting on his different tints. This may be considered as a new school; and, if judiciously managed, is certainly a great improvement in the art. It has been said, that he made great use of the rule, and produced some of his most forcible effects by trick; nothing can be more opposite to truth. His eye was peculiarly accurate; and by that he formed his judgment of proportions. Whoever inspected his pallette would find it covered with a greater variety of tints than almost any of his contemporaries employed – Mr. Moore was his first patron, and with him he went a tour into Scotland. The prospects he saw in that country gave that wildness of imagery to the scenery of his drawings, by which they are so pre-eminently distinguished. He also went with Mr. Moore to Peterborough, Lichfield, and Lincoln; and, indeed, to many other places remarkable for their rich scenery, either in nature or architecture. That gentleman has a drawing that Girtin made of Exeter Cathedral, which was principally coloured on the spot where it was drawn: for he was so uncommonly indefatigable, that, when he had made a sketch of any place, he never wished to quit it until he had given it all the proper tints. This we particularly notice, because it was generally supposed he was careless in taking his sketches, when, in fact, he was remarkably accurate in making them, though very careless of them after they were made. He was early noticed by Lord Harewood, Mr. Lascelles, and Dr. Monro; in whose collections are some of those fine specimens of the arts by the study of which he formed his taste. The Doctor has in his possession some of his earliest, and many of his finest, drawings. He painted two pictures in oil; the first was a view in Wales, which was exhibited, and much noticed, in1801; and the second, the Panorama View of London, which is now on exhibition in Spring-gardens, and may, if taken in all its points, be fairly considered as the most classical picture that has yet been painted in that branch of the art, which may fairly be denominated the triumph of perspective. About twelve months before his death he went to France, where he stayed till May. His last, and indeed his best, drawings were the views of Paris, which were purchased by Lord Essex, and from which his brother intends publishing engravings. These views were taken at different times of the day; and, as the Parisians are rather jealous of any person, especially a foreigner, taking views of their metropolis, he, on those occasions, usually took a coach for a given number of hours, and stopped opposite to the place of which he intended to make a design; and he was so anxious to get the tints of Nature, that he frequently remained in it the whole day. He etched all the plates in the soft ground, so that they have all the effect of drawings. He delineated two of the scenes at Covent-garden theatre; one a view of the Conciergerie at Paris, for a pantomime of Dibdin’s, and the other the Rue St. Denis. Mr. Opie painted his portrait on a three-quarter canvas, and Mr. Edridge painted him in miniature; both of them are good pictures, and strongly resemble the original. He had a mask taken from his face; and from that mask Mr. Garrard, the animal-painter, intends forming a bust.

February 1803

The Monthly Magazine, vol.15 (February 1803), pp.83–84 (1803 – Item 2)

The wording of the second substantial obituary of Girtin is very close to that of the piece published in the Gentleman’s Magazine at the same time, but it does contain additional details that again suggest that the anonymous author was well briefed by the late artist’s brother, John Girtin (1773–1821).

At Mr. Norman’s, picture-frame maker, in the Strand, Mr. J. Girtin, a young artist of most promising and uncommon talents. He was born on the 18th of February, 1778, and died on the 9th of November, 1802. His complaint was an asthma, with which he was afflicted for many years, and his illness was very painful; but though of so long continuance, he bore it with much fortitude; and a short time before his death, he said, when Dr. Monro once attended him, ‘I do not care what you do with me, if you will only put me in such a way that I can continue to make drawings.’ Such was his attachment to his profession, that he worked at it only eight days before he died. Before the loss of his health his spirits were eminently high. He was interred at St. Paul’s, Covent Garden; his remains being attended by Sir William Beechey, Mr. Hearne, Mr. Turner, and Mr. Edridge, who thus paid their last tribute of respect to talents which they were so eminently qualified to appreciate. He was instructed in the first rudiments of his art by a drawing-master, of the name of Fisher, who then lived in Aldersgate street; and he was for a short time the pupil of Mr. Dayes. He early made nature his model; but the first master that struck his attention forcibly was Canaletti. Sir Joshua Reynolds was accustomed to say, that the colouring of Rubens was sun-shine; and this Girtin seems to have felt, for in the latter part of his life he sedulously studied the colouring of that great master. He was the first who introduced the custom of drawing upon cartridge paper; by which means he avoided the spotty, glittering glare, so common in drawings made on white paper; and some of his later productions have as forcible and spirited an effect as an oil picture, and are more clear. In his first manner he made the outline with a pen, but lately did away that hard outline, which gives so edgy an effect to drawings that are not in other respects destitute of merit; and, having first given his general forms with Indian ink, finished his work by putting on his different tints. This may be considered as a new school; and, if judiciously managed, is certainly a great improvement in the art. It has been said, that he made great use of the rule, and produced some of his most forcible effects by trick: – nothing can be more opposite to truth. His eye was peculiarly accurate; and by that he formed his judgment of proportions. Whoever inspected his pallet would find it covered with a greater variety of tints than almost any of his contemporaries employed – Mr. Moore was his first patron, and with him he went a tour into Scotland. The prospects he saw in that country gave that wildness of imagery to the scenery of his drawings, by which they are so preeminently distinguished. He also went with Mr. Moore to Peterborough, Litchfield, and Lincoln; and indeed to many other places remarkable for their rich scenery, either in nature or architecture. That gentleman has a drawing that Girtin made of Exeter cathedral, which was principally coloured on the spot where it was drawn: for he was so uncommonly indefatigable, that when he had made a sketch of any place, he never wished to quit it until he had given it all the proper tints. This we particularly notice, because it was generally supposed he was careless in making his sketches, when, in fact, he was remarkably accurate in making them, though very careless of them after they were made. He was early noticed by Lord Harewood, Mr. Lascelles, and Doctor Monro; in whose collections are some of those fine specimens of the arts, by the study of which he formed his taste. The Doctor has in his possession some of his earliest, and many of his finest, drawings. He painted two pictures in oil; the first was a View in Wales, which was exhibited, and much noticed, in 1801; and the second, the Panorama View of London, which is now on exhibition in Spring Gardens, and may, if taken in all its points, be fairly considered as the most classical picture that has yet been painted in that branch of the art, which may fairly be denominated the triumph of perspective. About twelve months before his death he went to France, where he staid till May. His last, and indeed his best drawings were the Views of Paris, which were purchased by Lord Essex, and from which his brother intends publishing engravings. These views were taken at different times of the day; and, as the Parisians are rather jealous of any person, especially a foreigner, taking views of their metropolis, he, on those occasions, usually took a coach for a given number of hours, and stopped opposite to the place of which he intended to make a design; and he was so anxious to get the tints of nature, that he frequently remained in it the whole day. He etched all the plates in the soft ground, so that they have all the effect of drawings. He delineated two of the scenes at Covent Garden theatre; one a view of the Conciergerie at Paris, for a pantomime of Dibdin’s, and the other the Rue St. Denis. Mr. Opie painted his portrait on a three-quarter canvas, and Mr. Edridge painted him in miniature; both of them are good pictures, and strongly resemble the original. He had a mask taken from his face and from that mask Mr. Garrard, the animal-painter, intends forming a bust.

1 February 1803

The Monthly Magazine, vol.15 (February 1803), p.58

The late Mr. Girtin’s Panorama View of London, still continues open to the public, and may, when taken in every point of view, be fairly considered as the connoisseur’s picture.

1 February 1803

The Lady’s Monthly Museum, vol.10 (February 1803), pp.128–29

A review appears of the opening night of Thomas Dibdin’s (1771–1841) pantomime Harlequin’s Habeas, or The Hall of Spectres at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden, on 27 December. Its effect is ‘embellished by the art of the mechanist, and the taste of the painter’.

4 February 1803

The aquatint A General View of Paris, taken from CHAILLOT, plate five of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1868a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by William Pickett (1740–1812).

26 February 1803

Letter from ‘A. Harman’, clerk to Samuel Whitbread (1764–1815), saying that he has met Samuel William Reynolds (1773–1835) in London (Bedfordshire Archives (WI/4061)) (1803 – Item 3)

I inclose an Account of the Drawings he disposed after of the date & though he is not quite certain, though he believes them to be very near the truth & will get more exact information of the Girtins should you find it necessary.

On a separate sheet:

Drawings Dunstanborough Castle            10 Months        W Duppa         

£22

  Bamborough Castle                                                                
  Widmore                                15 Months        W Harrison       £16
  Cottage in Essex                                                                    
  Jedborough                                                                           
  Jedborough Abbey                                                                 
  Linmouth                                                                              
  Lidford Castle                                                                        
  View in Wales                         15 Months        W Weddell       

£50

  Kirkstall Abbey 2 Months          Exchanged  
  View in Widmore - small 10 Months           
Pictures        
  1 Wilson                                12 Months        Exchanged  

3 March 1803

The Morning Chronicle, 3 March 1803, p.2

VIEWS IN PARIS AND EIDOMETROPOLIS

Dedicated by Permission to the Right Hon. the Earl of Essex. The Original Drawings being now in his Lordship’s Collection, a Selection of Twenty of the most Picturesque Views in Paris and its Environs, drawn and etched by the late THOS. GIRTIN, being the only etchings of that celebrated artist with French and English Descriptions, and will include most of the principal Buildings, Bridges, among which are –

The Thuilleries – Pont Neuf – St. Cloud

The Louvre – College of 4 Nations – Belle Vue

General View of Paris – The Mint – St. Germain en Laye

The City – Pont St. Michel – Chaillot

Pont Notre Dame – The City Theatres – Charenton

Porte St. Denis – The Pantheon – Hotel des Invalides –

The Conciergerie Prison – Notre Dame – Hotel des Invalides

Pont au Change – Pont Tournelle – Water Works at Marli, &c.

This work will form a Volume in boards, size 27 inches by 19. The early Impressions, 6 Guineas; the Prints, 5 Guineas; no money received until the delivery, which will be in a few weeks. Published by M. A. and John Girtin, engraver and printer, No. 1, Little Newport-street, Gerrard-street, Soho.

Agreeable to the request of several friends to have a Portrait of the late Thomas Girtin, to accompany this Work, they are most respectfully informed that there is one now in great forwardness, engraving by S. W. Reynolds, from a most capital Picture by J. Opie, Esq. R. A. The price will be half-a-guinea, and the early Subscribers will have the advantage of Proof Impressions without any advance.

The Eidometropolis, by the same Artist, upon the amazing extensive scale of 1944 square feet, now exhibiting at Spring Gardens. This wonderful performance is allowed to surpass every thing of the kind ever yet seen of the Panorama system, for its deceptive power, grandeur of effect, astonishing correctness of perspective, chasteness of colouring, &c. – A good fire kept in the Gallery. – Admission 1s

22 March 1803

The title page for Girtin’s Picturesque Views in Paris is published with an ornate inscription etched by the artist’s brother, John Girtin (1773–1821). It reads:

A

SELECTION

OF TWENTY of the most PICTURESQUE

Views in

PARIS,

AND ITS ENVIRONS.

Drawn AND Etched

In the Year of 1802, by the late

THOMAS GIRTIN;

Being the Only Etchings of that Celebrated Artist

And Aquatinted in exact Imitation of the Original Drawings

In the Collection of the

RT. HONBLE. THE EARL OF ESSEX.

LONDON: Pub. March 22 1803 by M. A. & JOHN GIRTIN. No.1 Little Newport Street, SOHO Written & Engraved by JNo GIRTIN

28 March 1803

The Morning Chronicle, 28 March 1803

A FEW DAYS LONGER

THE EIDOMETROPOLIS, or GREAT PANORAMA of London … painted by the late THOMAS GIRTON … will close the middle of this week.

VIEWS of PARIS, drawn and etched by the same Artist, will begin publishing this week, consisting of 20 Plates. Early Impressions six guineas, Prints five guineas. The Work may be seen at Mr John Girtin’s, Engraver and Printer, No. 1, Little Newport-street, Gerrard-street, Soho.

4 April 1803

The aquatint View from Palace Terrace, at St. Germain en Laye, the AQUEDUCT OF MARLI, seen in the Distance, plate sixteen of Picturesque Views in Paris, is published (see print after TG1884a). Girtin’s etched plate had been worked in aquatint by Joseph Constantine Stadler (active 1780–1819).

The same day as the publication of the last of the twenty prints that make up Girtin’s Picturesque Views in Paris also sees the appearance of its dedication page, addressed to the ‘Right Honorable George, Earl of Essex’ (George Capel-Coningsby, 5th Earl of Essex (1757–1839)). The ornate inscription, etched by John Girtin (1773–1821) and signed by him as the co-publisher with Mary Ann Girtin (1781–1843), reads:

Your noble patronage of the following Work in addition to the many favors bestowed on my late Brother, during his progress in the Arts, is, much as I regret the occasion, become the pleasing duty on my part to acknowledge. – Incapable however of expression, adequate to my feelings, I can only assure your Lordship, I am perfectly susceptible of the honor conferr’d, and that I entertain the most grateful sense of your Lordship’s condescension.

3 June 1803

Mr Christie, A Catalogue of an Extensive and Valuable Assemblage of Original Sketches and Finished Drawings by Sawrey Gilpin, Esq. R. A. Also, A Collection of Valuable high-finished Tinted DRAWINGS and SKETCHES from Nature, By the Late Ingenious Artist Mr. Girtin, Deceased: The whole which of are in Portfolios, and in fine Preservation, 1 June 1803 (1803 – Item 4)

The more than 170 items, including finished watercolours, numerous ‘Studies from Nature’ and the artist’s only oil painting, were presumably consigned by the artist’s widow, Mary Ann Girtin (1781–1843). Other than John Girtin (1773–1821), it has only been possible to identify one of the purchasers at the sale, Sir Henry Charles Englefield (1752–1822).

  • 1 – ‘TWENTY-FOUR Various’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for 14s
  • 2 – ‘Seven, Views from Nature, York, &c.’. Bought by ‘Sir H. Englefield’ for £4 14s 6d
  • 3 – ‘Six, Ditto, Ruins, &c.’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for 12s
  • 4 – ‘Eight Views from Nature, Studies and Figures, &c.’. Sold for 16s
  • 5 – ‘Six, Studies from Nature, York, &c.’. Sold for £1 3s
  • 6 – ‘Five, Ditto’. Bought by ‘Sir H. Englefield’ for £2 6s
  • 7 – ‘Ditto’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for 17s
  • 8 – ‘Ditto’. Bought by ‘Thane’ for £2 15s
  • 9 – ‘Eight Ditto’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for £1 3s
  • 10 – ‘Ditto’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for £2 15s
  • 11 – ‘Ditto’. Sold for £2 4s
  • 12 – ‘Five Ditto’. Bought by ‘Barret’ for £2 3s
  • 13 – ‘Three Ditto’. Bought by ‘Neville’ for 14s
  • 14 – ‘Three Ditto’. Bought by ‘Barret’ for £2 12s 6d
  • 22 – ‘Four, Black Lead Sketches’. Bought by ‘Barret’ for £2 2s
  • 23 – ‘Ditto’. Bought by ‘Thane’ for £1 18s
  • 24 – ‘Four, Studies from Nature’. Sold for £1 11s
  • 25 – ‘Ditto’. Bought by ‘Vendramini’ for £4
  • 26 – ‘Ditto’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £3 10s
  • 27 – ‘One, a Drawing in Pencil’. Bought by ‘Sir H Englefield’ for £2 18s
  • 28 – ‘Port St. Denis’. Sold for £4 6s (TG1892)
  • 38 – ‘Rippon Minster, Study from Nature’. Bought by ‘Spilsbury’ for £2 15s
  • 39 – ‘Battersea Reach’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £10 10s
  • 40 – ‘Cottage in Essex’. Sold for £9 9s
  • 41 – ‘Warkworth Hermitage’. Bought by ‘Girtin’s Friend’ for £8 8s
  • 42 – ‘York Minster’. Bought by ‘Barret’ for £4 16s
  • 43 – ‘A Study from Nature’. Sold for £3 13s 6d
  • 44 – ‘Four, tinted studies from Nature, York, &c.’. Bought by ‘Graham’ for £1 18s
  • 54 – ‘A Mill and Warkworth Hermitage, Studies from Nature’. Sold for £2 18s (?TG1095)
  • 55 – ‘A Study from Nature, Widmore, near Totness’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £2
  • 56 – ‘Mill, at Berry Pomeroy Castle, Devon’. Bought by ‘Capt. Birch’ for £2 19s
  • 57 – ‘Two Studies from Nature, Knaresborough’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £1 8s
  • 58 – ‘Four, Plymouth Dock, with Part of Mount Edgecombe, &c.’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £1 8s
  • 59 – ‘A Study from Nature, Ruins’. Bought by ‘Leitham’ for £3 15s
  • 60 – ‘A Mill in Wales’. Bought by ‘Leitham’ for £5 18s
  • 61 – ‘Two, Tynemouth, black lead, and 1 in Tints’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £3 18s
  • 62 – ‘A Study from Nature’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £2 10s
  • 63 – ‘Ditto’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for £4
  • 64 – ‘Two Ditto, Ruins’. Sold for £1 6s
  • 65 – ‘A Study from Nature’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for £7 7s
  • 76 – ‘Three, a Sketch in Bister, and 2 Studies from Nature’. Bought by ‘Spilsbury’ for £2 2s
  • 77 – ‘Three. 1, Richmond, Yorkshire, 1 from Nature, 1 of Ruins’. Sold for £4 4s
  • 78 – ‘River Ex, Devon’. Bought by ‘Barrett’ for £7 17s 6d
  • 79 – ‘A Study from Nature, Tintern Abbey, and 1 of Widmore’. Bought by ‘Ws’ for £5 15s 6d
  • 80 – ‘Coast of Dorsetshire, with Town of Lyme’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £5 10s (TG1251)
  • 94 – ‘One, from the Toy, Hampton Court’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for £3 15s (TG1748)
  • 95 – ‘One, an East India View’. Bought by ‘Harman’ for £2 (?TG0863)
  • 96 – ‘One, Scar Cross, Devon’. Bought by ‘Barrett’ for £7 7s (TG1456)
  • 97 – ‘One, Dartmouth, Devon’. Sold for £2 2s
  • 120 – ‘Rippon Minster, an exceedingly high finished Drawing’. Sold for £11 11s
  • 122 – ‘Leathersellers’ Hall, Bishopsgate Street, before it was pulled down’. Sold for £5 10s (TG1410 or TG1411)
  • 123 – ‘Interior of St. Albans’. Sold for £6
  • 129 – ‘Ouse Bridge, York’. Sold for £21 10s 6d (TG1649)
  • 130 – ‘One of the Gates at York’. Sold for £22 1s (?TG1652)
  • 131 – ‘A View in the North of Devonshire, framed’. Sold for £2 10s
  • 132 – ‘A View in Devonshire’. Sold for £7 12s
  • 133 – ‘A VIEW OF BOLTON BRIDGE, Yorkshire, the only Picture this ingenious Artist ever painted’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for £25 4s (TG1687)
  • 134 – ‘An Historical Picture’. Bought by ‘Girtin’ for £3

16 June 1803

The Times, 16 June 1803, p.1

PARIS – Now publishing, VIEWS of PARIS and its ENVIRONS, drawn and etched in soft ground by the Late THOMAS GIRTIN, being the only etchings of that celebrated Artist, and aquatinted, in exact imitation of the Original Drawings now in the collection of the Right Hon. the Earl of Essex to whom, by permission, this work is most respectfully dedicated; consisting of 20 Plates, size 27 inches by 19, in Boards. – Early Impressions 6 guineas. Prints, 5 guineas. Mrs. and W. J. Girtin, Engravers and Printers, 1, Little Newport-street, Leicester-square return their most grateful thanks for the liberal Subscription to this Work, and most respectfully inform their Subscribers, it is now delivering. There are likewise a few sets of the Etchings for Amateurs. Mrs. and W. G. Further beg leave to caution the Public against impositions on the Works of the late T. G. There being a number of Drawings about town exposed for sale, of places the latter never saw. The great Panorama of London, lately exhibited at Spring Gardens, is to be sold.

5 July 1803

Kenneth Garlick and others, eds., The Diary of Joseph Farington (Farington, Diary, 5 July 1803)

Having talked with Dr Thomas Monro (1759–1833), Joseph Farington (1747–1821) notes:

Turner & Girtin He afterwards employed. – Girtin’s mother kept a Turners Shop in or near Aldersgate St. – He was apprenticed to Dayes.

December 1803

The Gentleman’s Magazine, vol.73 (December 1803), p.1182

A plain, neat monument has lately been erected in the church-yard of St. Paul, Covent-garden, with the following inscription:

“Sacred to the memory of

Mr. THOMAS GIRTIN, Artist,

who departed this life Nov. 9, 1802,

aged 27 years.”

1 December 1803

The Morning Chronicle, 1 December 1803, p.3

A monument, in memory of the late ingenious Mr. GIRTIN, the artist, has been placed on his grave, in the church-yard of St. Paul, Covent-garden. Mr. GIRTIN was a man of true genius.

2 December 1803

The Morning Post, 2 December 1803, p.3

A monument to the memory of the late Mr. GIRTIN, the ingenious Artist, has just been placed on his grave, in the church-yard of St. Paul’s, Covent-garden.

The monument was lost sometime during the nineteenth century.

1802

The Pont Saint Michel, from the Pont Neuf: Colour Study for Plate Four of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1866b

1802

The Pont au Change, the Théâtre de la Cité, the Pont Neuf and the Conciergerie Prison, Taken from the Pont Notre Dame: Colour Study for Plate Nine of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1876a

1802

The Palace and Village of Choisy from the Banks of the Seine: Colour Study for Plate Fourteen of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1882a

1802

The Watermill above the Bridge at Charenton: Colour Study for Plate Nineteen of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1890a

1802

The Banks of the Marne below the Bridge at Charenton: Colour Study for Plate Twenty of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1887a

1802

The Panthéon, from the Arsenal, Looking across the Seine: Colour Study for Plate Twelve of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1879b

1802

The Tuileries Palace and the Pont Royal, Taken from the Pont de la Concorde: Colour Study for Plate Six of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1871a

1802

The Pont Neuf, Part of the Louvre, Notre Dame and the College of the Four Nations: Colour Study for Plate Seven of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1872a

1802

The Water Works at Marly, Saint-Germain-en-Laye in the Distance: Colour Study for Plate Fifteen of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1883a

1802

The Village of Chaillot, Taken from the Pont de la Concorde: Colour Study for Plate Seventeen of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1885a

1802

The Pont Neuf and the Mint: Colour Study for Plate Eight of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1874a

1802

Panoramic View of Paris from Chaillot, Looking Up the Seine with the Dome of Les Invalides: Colour Study for Plate Five of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1868a

1802

The View from the Palace Terrace at Saint-Germain-en-Laye, the Aqueduct of Marly in the Distance: Colour Study for Plate Sixteen of ‘Picturesque Views in Paris’

TG1884a

1802

Paris: Porte Saint-Denis and the Boulevard Saint-Denis

TG1892

(?) 1796

Warkworth Hermitage

TG1095

1797 - 1798

The Coast of Dorset, with Lyme Regis Below

TG1251

1800 - 1801

The Thames from a Window of the Old Toy Inn, Hampton Court

TG1748

1797 - 1798

The Gateway Leading to the Sulaimani Tomb Complex at Churnargarh

TG0863

1798 - 1799

Starcross

TG1456

(?) 1799

London: The Leathersellers’ Hall

TG1410

(?) 1799

London: The Interior of the Ruins of the Leathersellers’ Hall

TG1411

1800

The Ouse Bridge, York

TG1649

1800 - 1801

York: The Layerthorpe Bridge and Postern

TG1652

(?) 1801

Bolton Bridge

TG1687